Tag Archives: Colorado Engagement Session

Bridesmaids – The Tradition Of Having Bridesmaids In Your Wedding

How many bridesmaids will be in your wedding?  Why do we have bridesmaids?
At one time, a bride had a court of maids and the primary reason was to fool evil spirits, yes that’s right, evil spirits.  Bridesmaids clothed themselves in a similar fashion as the bride;  it was to confuse ill presences hovering around the wedding.  The ill presence could be in spirit form, or the human kind that just might have intentions to kidnap the bride.  Don’t you know it is difficult to nab the correct woman when her maids are dressed in similar attire!  This superstition of dressing the bridal party the same,  also offered protection from an ill-doer wanting to steal her dowry, which is confusing to me, did she have that on her person?
Colorado Wedding Photographers
Colorado Wedding Photographers
The Groomsmen
The Groomsmen
In Rome, law demanded that witnesses come to the wedding to add confusion to the spirits that had evil intent for the bride and groom.  eHow’s “History of Bridesmaids” states that: “female wedding attendants came to a marriage ceremony in garments akin to the bride’s, while male wedding attendants–the forebears of ushers–wore attire that resembled the groom’s own clothing. This supposedly threw off bad luck that could be directed towards an easily identifiable bride and groom.”  Honestly, I never really knew why the wedding party wore the exact same outfit.
We have photographed all varieties of bridal party clothing; men who are required to wear a dark suit of their choice and matching ties, or bridesmaids that wear a dress of their choice all in a similar color, people in casual clothing; parties in all matching dresses, all matching tux’s.  I think bridal parties, at least partially, are breaking from the old tradition.
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The tradition of kidnapping brides has pretty much died off, though, I can’t say for sure if evil spirits still hang out weddings.  That is definitely out of my realm.  In the past, no person of social status was unattended, the more the status, the bigger the wedding bridal/grooms party, a nice way to show off the family’s wealth.  So, why do we still have a bridal party in modern times?  From what I can tell, a girl likes to have her friends around her on a special day, and a guy likes hanging with his buddies to celebrate.   And let us not forget the added bonus of the parties that friends often help throw for the bride and groom leading up to the wedding!
On the wedding day; the bridesmaid is kind of like an executive assistant and helps the bride with her needs on her wedding day.  She is someone who the bride can lean on and celebrate with.
Cielo wedding photographer
I am guessing the bridal party exists today for a multitude of reasons.  They definitely are a big help to the bride and groom, fulfilling little tasks, tying loose ends last minute etc.  Tradition certainly plays a role, although, I am convinced that the average bride and groom are probably not familiar with the true beginning of having attendants.  Moral and emotional support given by the party on this important day is definitely a reason to have close friends around.  The end result is a nice support system of friends that always end up having a laugh and a good time!  It seems like a very nice tradition and a way to bond with friends!

The Money Dance

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Ahhhh the money dance.  I have always know it to be a dance that the male guests dance with the bride and the female guests dance with the groom.  Traditionally a dollar was pinned to the bride by every partner, but in more recent times, I have seen the best man collect the dollars…so no pins.  I come from an area of strong Italian decent and these are the weddings where I would see the dollar dance.  Also, New York weddings seem to strongly favor the dance.

After witnessing more weddings as I go along; I don’t think the money dance is reserved for Italian descent, the Spanish, Greek and Polish seem to use this tradition as well!  The dance does offer the bride and groom a chance to have a personal visit with all of their guests.  So, instead of roaming around visiting your guests whilst they are eating, you can turn to the money dance.  The best man and maid of honor will limit the time of the individual dances to a couple spins around the floor so that you, the bridal couple, have and opportunity to dance and visit with everyone.  If the money dance feels awkward or tacky to you, how about the money collected goes to your favorite charity?  Win, win, you get to visit all the guests and the money goes to a good cause.  Or, if you are on a strict budget, then embrace the dance and keep the money for your honeymoon! …it is just a buck after all!

It turns out that the money dance seems to have originated in Poland in the early 1900’s.  So, as customs and traditions go, it is a relatively new tradition.  Many cultures employ the dance as it turns out and  in the United States, there are areas where the dance is very popular, as well as areas that it is unheard of.  Basically, in all the cultures, it is just a way to give and extra dollar to the bride and groom which represents a wish of good luck and prosperity, and, of course offers an opportunity for a personal visit.

I am going to go ahead and show you what is on wikepedia since there is such variety, and I would not want you to miss out on all of the potential origins!  Here it is:

Poland

The money dance may have originated in Poland around the beginning of the 20th century. The dance takes place some time after the First dance, often once guests have had a chance to have a few drinks. The best man or MC or the disc jockey announces the event. Customarily, the best man begins dancing with the bride, pinning money onto her wedding gown or putting it into a purse, which she carries especially for the purpose, or into the pockets of an apron she dons over her gown especially for this dance. In a more contemporary version of this custom, the dance includes bridesmaids and other ladies who dance .

Ukraine

At Ukrainian weddings, the father of the bride usually begins pinning money on her dress. He is followed by the best man and groomsmen, and, finally, by the remainder of the male guests. Another variation is where the bride’s veil is removed and given to the maid of honor and an apron is placed on the bride. Money is then placed into her apron during the dance.

Yugoslavia

At Yugoslavian weddings, instead of pinning the money on the bride’s gown, the male guests give the money to the best man for safe keeping.

Hungary

At Hungarian and Portuguese weddings[citation needed], the bride takes off her shoes and puts them in the middle of the dance floor. Then the shoes are passed around from guests to guest and each deposits a contribution.

North America

Mexico

Relatives take turns dancing up to the bride and groom and pinning money on their clothes, which allows the couple to spend a few moments with each of their guests. After the money dance, the groom is ridiculed by his friends, tossed in the air while being covered with the veil, and given an apron and broom.

United States

In America, practice of a money dance varies by geographic region and ethnic background of the families involved. It typically involves guests giving small sums of cash to the bride or pinning cash to her gown or veil. Even cultures that accept this may balk at paying the groom for his time and attention, so alternatives have developed, such as “paying” the groom with play money or a stick ofchewing gum. Some consider this a way for the bride and groom to have face time with their guests. Many, including traditional North American etiquette experts, consider the practice incorrect.[1]

This has led to some couples calling it the honeymoon dance instead of a dollar dance or money dance. Some couples have even called it the dime dance and have put dimes under each person’s plate or in a small bowl on each table so that guests won’t feel obligated to ‘pay’ for a short dance with the bride or groom, while still giving them the opportunity to spend 30–60 seconds chatting and dancing with them.

The Philippines

At some Filipino weddings, the money dance is usually announced; males line up in front of the bride, pinning money on her dress or veil, then dance with her. Same with the male, only females line up instead. Money is pinned or taped onto the new married couple’s garments, representing the wish that good fortune is “rained” upon them, while also helping the couple financially as they begin their life together.

Denver Engagement Session in Lodo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I was just going through and editing my blog when I noticed this blog post didn’t have any text.  We photographed this engagement session in downtown Denver, in Lodo.  You could not have asked for a more beautiful day!

Allow me to go off on a tangent here…  we do a lot of our “urban” photo shoots in Lodo.  It has so many locations to shoot at in a very small radius, making it very productive for the time we spend with our clients.  It also has architectural elements that match our style of photography, from rusty metal textures & brick, to  not so pretty alleys.  We love to utilize these gritty elements to contrast our pretty, good looking clients.  Again, check out our website to see more images that display what I’m trying to describe.

WEDDING TRADTIONS –

I would like to introduce my wife Peggy.  As some of you may know Peggy is a second shooter that works with me, and foremost, she is my lovely wife.  Having been through a wedding of our own and witness to many friends, family and client weddings, she has and avid interest in the art of putting together a wedding.

Often when we meet with clients, Peggy will go along.  She’ll often speak her mind when it comes to what we see when people are influenced by traditions and customs.  She would also tell you that she see’s many couples motivated by the objective of making their wedding different.  Either way, the ceremony and celebration are always interesting and it is fun for my wife to watch the process unfold into the final day.

She will be writing a few blog posts on the subject of wedding traditions.  Just in case you are interested on the background details of the customs and traditions that may be influencing your wedding.

I hope that you will enjoy her posts!

Trust me she’ll loves this pic!  ha ha!:

Colorado Wedding Photographers – Urban Denver Engagement Session

Last week I met with clients at City O’ City restaurant in the Capital Hill neighborhood in Denver.  As I was walking from my car to the restaurant, I was noticing how many great spots there were to shoot an Engagement session.  Well… we put my observations to the test yesterday, when I met Megan and Joey to shoot their Engagement session.  We met at City O’ City for a beer, then headed out to shoot in the alleys and streets of the ‘hood.  I have a feeling that this won’t be the last time we shoot here.  Check out their pics!  We had a great time.

As always, comments are not only welcome, but encouraged!  Leave them at the bottom of the blog post.

Colorado Wedding Photographer – Engagement Session in Golden, CO

Tis the season for Engagement sessions!  Yesterday we met Jane Lee and Brendan at the Buffalo Rose, in Golden to discuss their wedding and get to know each other before we headed over to the Clear Creek History Park.  I had never been there before, but I know I will be back.  This place is full of cool old buildings that have amazing character and textures.  We love shooting backdrops like this.  Utilizing rough textures like stone, old wood, flakey paint…  It ads a nice contrast to a great looking couple like Jane Lee and Brendan.   Check out their pics.  I’m sure you’ll agree!

Comments are not only welcome, but encouraged, so please leave them at the bottom of this post.  Also… if you like our work, please “Like” us on Facebook!